Ventilator Care

Trinity Village is proud to be one of the only available ventilator programs in Wisconsin.

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Ventilator Care

The best achievable quality of life is at the center of our respiratory therapy and ventilator program. Adjusting to life with respiratory challenges, tracheotomy or a ventilator can seem overwhelming, but understanding the available resources makes living with a ventilator manageable.

Our dedicated, interdisciplinary team of respiratory therapists and nursing staff have decades of experience. The unit itself is designed uniquely with comfort and safety in mind. An integrated alarm system immediately notifies nurses and therapists when patients need attention.

We focus on the strength and endurance of each patient to ensure success. Whenever possible, weaning from a "vent" is our long-term goal. A well-developed care routine builds trust with patients and their families, allowing us to share the benefits of our expertise.

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The VOCSN Advantage

The VOCSN Vent seamlessly integrates five separate devices including a ventilator, oxygen concentration. cough assist, suction, and nebulizer into one unified respiratory system. Simple mobile and care changing for patients and care givers with exclusive technology to switch between therapies with the touch of a button. Only at BRIA of Trinity Village... because there is a better way!

The BRIA Approach to Ventilator Care

We provide an individualized plan of care that assess respiratory function in an effort to decrease and eliminate the need for mechanical breathing. support while maximizing each person's functional and psychological capabilities.

Our multilevel team approach is uniquely designed to prepare individuals for the transition to the next level of care for continued overall improvement in their health and well-being.

Remaining as active as possible also facilitates rehab and recovery. A respiratory therapist joins our recreation staff, ensuring that ventilator patients are able to safely and confidently participate in activities and outings outside of the unit. We are dedicated to quality of life, encouraging patients to get out of bed, eat, and live as independently as possible.

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Start your Virtual Tour

BRIA of Trinity Village has apartments for rent now with no entrance fee required!  Call for more information on renting an apartment.

Start your Virtual Tour

BRIA of Trinity Village has apartments for rent now with no entrance fee required!  Call for more information on renting an apartment.

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Our Program Features

State-of-the-art ventilator care in a homelike setting

We have developed our program to enhance the lives and independence of ventilator assisted patients by providing the best patient-centered quality of care in a homelike setting.  There is no better place than Trinity Village.  We take respiratory care to another level!

Triple-level ventilator alarm system- Intelligent respiratory event alert and compliance monitoring

State-of-the-art ventilators- provides 5 therapies in one machine-includes high performance nebulizer, portable oxygen concentrator, hospital grade suction unit, ventilator, and touch button cough assist all on one circuit. Customizable to each patient

Dedicated ventilator unit led by board-certified pulmonologist

Speech therapy for bedside swallow evaluations and communication strategies

Physical and occupational therapy to increase endurance and ability

Highly skilled Respiratory Therapists on site 24/7

Regular consultations with program pulmonologist

An advanced care team that works with a common goal of weaning patients off ventilation

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Faq’s

Q.What does a ventilator mean for me or my loved one?

A.While the terms “pulmonary” and “respiratory” are generally used to describe breathing and the lungs, our program takes respiratory care to another level. We’ve learned never to underestimate our patients, as many individuals with tracheostomies or ventilators can live independent, active lives. As one patient put it, “I’m not attached to the ventilator. The ventilator is attached to me.” Life with a ventilator can bring unique challenges, but the right care can help you gain strength and confidence.

Q.Will I be able to eat or talk?

A.Vents do require special attention when it comes to eating. Some people may have trouble swallowing due to the trach or other medical conditions, and will require feeding tubes or special diets of softened foods or thickened liquids. Speech can present some challenges for people with trachs and vents. While you may be able to learn to use a speaking valve, other options include having your lips read, using a letter board, or writing messages using paper or a whiteboard. Specially trained speech therapists can help you strengthen muscles and find the best way for you to communicate, and can even help you find the best way to get nutrition, whether through oral feeding or other means.

Q.How can a Speech Therapist help?

A.Did you know that speech therapists can help with more than just speech? With a thorough knowledge of muscles in the mouth and throat, speech therapists are instrumental in helping vent and trach patients regain strength and improve quality of life. Rehab plans often include a speech therapist who works with patients to retrain and strengthen the muscles necessary in swallowing and speech. For example, speech therapists can help patients who have difficulty swallowing. They assist in determining the best diet or feeding option for patients with trachs and vents. Bedside swallow exams allow a speech therapist to evaluate a patient’s current abilities, modifying their diet accordingly. Speech therapists also help patients find the best way to communicate. Vocalizing can be frustrating and tiring with a vent. Goals of therapy may include training to use a speaking valve, strengthening throat muscles to make speech easier, or learning to communicate through non-vocal means.